Cabinet of Curiosities


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App Description

Category:Education
Description:
Cabinet of Curiosities—the app for the abundantly curious!

This tool, combined with your mobile device, will take you on an unforgettable journey of discovery. Collect any and everything that looks interesting, unusual, or curious. Take a picture of it. Give it a name. Look at it carefully; describe it in words and pictures. Share your collection with friends. They may be able to identify some of your “unknowns” or observe things you have missed. Your growing “Cabinet of Curiosities” will reflect your passions and interests and serve as a long-term source of wonder and enjoyment!

• Create up to 20 separate collections and journals.
• Each collection allows for 21 specimens.
• Take up to 6 photographs of each specimen, or add photos to your Cabinet by adding from your photo library.
• Each photo can be edited.
• Provide a written narrative each of your specimens.
• Record a spoken narrative for each specimen.
• Share photos and written narratives.

Perfect for grown up nature lovers and parents or teachers who want to encourage the process of scientific inquiry with their children or students. Watch the Action Agendas website for teacher materials that will help you use Cabinet of Curiosities in your classroom and at home!

Plus, here are a few other creative and innovative ways to use the app:

1. Digital Evidence Locker

Victims of bullies and cyber bullies need a way to collect and organize evidence of bullying. Instead of collecting scientific specimens, you collect and record instances of abuse. Add screenshots of cyber bullying or photographic evidence to your collection. Journal the date, time, location, and circumstances by written or spoken narrative while events are fresh in your mind.

You can use this approach to become a digital crime fighter for other investigative situations, as well. Bring out the amateur crime scene investigator in you and collect your own evidence of wrongdoing.

2. Research Paper Organizer

Which books, publications, or online sources did you use for your research paper? Use a collection to organize your data. Instead of collecting scientific specimens, you collect and record sources for your paper. Take a cover photo or add a screenshot to recall the source. Create a written narrative of the information you need. Record a spoken narrative for extra notes and special details you'll need to recall when you begin crafting the research paper.

3. Collectables

Have a collection of comic books, action figures, sports cards, memorabilia, or figurines? Record and share the top 21 pieces of your collection, whatever it may be. What condition are your collectables? Why are these your favorites? How did you track down these special items? They all have a story to tell, and you can tell it in photographic, written, and audio-recorded form.

4. Top 21 Lists

What are your favorite movies? What are your favorite foods? What are your favorite books? Top-10 lists are all the rage, but we’ll let you organize your favorites all the way to 21.